SUDAN (The last male rhino on earth)

 

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Can you try to imagine the death of the last white man or, maybe black man on earth! That it comes a time when you can hear no more of the male gender of a certain race. One day you wake up to the news that two women are the only surviving members of a certain race!

I know by now some of you are already wondering what the hell I’m talking about. Thinking how no such thing is possible under the sun. But guess what? It recently happened, though not to man but to another of God’s creation.

Sometime last week we saw the sad story of Sudan trending. For those who think I’m talking about Omar al-Bashir’s Sudan or our northern war-torn neighbors, South Sudan, no I’m not.  I’m talking about Sudan the rhinoceros.

Sudan was one of the endangered species of the white rhino but of the rare Northern White sub-species ( northern square-lipped rhinoceros) — of course the other sub-species being the Southern White rhinoceros who still have quite a substantial number in terms of population (about 19,000).

Hope you got why I used “race” at the beginning of this article.

Sudan died on 19th last month in OL Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya due to age-related complications (so we were told). He was 45 at the time of his death (scientists say it’s the equivalent of 90 in humans), having been born in 1973.  Sudan and his family had been moved to Ol Pejeta from Dvur Kralove Zoo in the Czech Republic in the year 2009.

There were only three remaining Northern White Rhinos in the whole world, Sudan and his two daughters, Najin and Fatu. Fatu is 17 while her sister is 27. Now we only have two poor females after Sudan’s death.

We can as well say, that’s the end of the Northern White Rhino sub-species of the White Rhino species. In other words, Sudan died with his species. In less than 30 years from now, we will be saying goodbye to the Northern White Rhinoceros. This sub-species will soon join a number of other species who are declared extinct like the other close relative, West African Black Rhinoceros who was declared extinct in 2011; Dodo, a bird I’ve mentioned in quite a number of my previous posts like African Elephant. We also had the Passenger Pigeon, Javan Tiger and the Sea Mink, just to name a few who are no more. Extinct!

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Photo by Glen Carrie on Unsplash

It’s so sad! How did we as the human race let that happen! How did we not see this coming?  Word from Ol Pejeta Conservancy is that several conservation efforts had been made to try to save the sub-species.

Really! I don’t believe them. At this age of technology I expected more! I expected to hear some positive news even after the death of Sudan, the last male — the other died in 2014 due to natural causes — like,

 “we may have lost Sudan, but thank God we still have some of his semen stored in our semen bank”. But guess it’s too late now. We just have to sit and helplessly watch the end of the Northern White Rhino.

Rest in peace Sudan.

Hopefully this is the last time we are going to see this. Seriously, as humans we need to be very careful in the way we take care of these endangered species in the future. From the bottom of my heart I believe it’s our God-given responsibility.

And you should take time, for those who love animals, and pay Sudan’s daughters a visit. They’ll appreciate it, I’m sure.  They need our collective love and support, and honestly, you might be seeing this sub-species for the last time on earth. And if you drop by, don’t forget to say hi.

 

 

 

10 thoughts on “SUDAN (The last male rhino on earth)

  1. I makes no sense to utterly destroy any species.
    After the Great Depression in the 1930s it was very rare to see the American Whitetail Deer because starving families hunted them to a critical point.
    This is why today hunters must buy a license. The money raised from the license is used to pay for game wardens and biologist to maintain the population. Today the deer are everywhere in my area.
    Conservation works but it should be done early. It also requires people who have a code of ethics to follow the management program.
    I don’t know if it’s too late for some subspecies like Sudan but if we lose more special animals it shouldn’t be because we didn’t try.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Well said sir. Thank you so much for your words because in there, lies hope for these poor animals. As I said in the post, we have to do better as humans. We have to take care of endangered species not just for us alone, but for future generations. You have yourself a great time.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. It’s saddening for sure. No animal deserve such injustice. Being wiped off the face of the earth! But hope we’ve learnt our lesson as the human race. Thank you so much for finding time to read and also for the feedback. I appreciate. Have a great time.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. In the past few years, the thought of Rhinos facing extinction seemed to be too far-fetched. Now, I can’t believe I’ll be telling my children that I lived during the days when Rhinos are still alive. It sounds ancient, not knowing that it happened not too long ago. Everything happened so sudden.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Sure, felt that too each time someone brought up the topic but now it’s happening. And it’s so saddening! Thank you dear for your feedback. Have a wonderful time and let’s help take care of these poor creatures,

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Don’t mention it. It’s our duty to be aware of these things. We all live in the same planet anyway, so why not look after each other? Have a nice day too, friend. More power to your blog.

        Liked by 1 person

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